Cover of: The Malbone Street Wreck | Brian Cudahy

The Malbone Street Wreck

  • 120 Pages
  • 4.81 MB
  • 5871 Downloads
  • English
by
Fordham University Press
American history: from c 1900 -, Public health & preventive medicine, Railway transport industries, Social history, United States - General, Malbone Street Wreck, New York, N.Y., 1918, History - U.S., History, Subways, History: American, New York, Railroads - History, United States - State & Local - General, Accidents, Malbone Street Wreck, New York, New York (S
The Physical Object
FormatPaperback
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8118958M
ISBN 100823219321
ISBN 139780823219322
OCLC/WorldCa41176669

Although it took place inThe Malbone Street Wreck stands as the worst mass transit disaster in US history. And Brian Cudahy is the person to tell the tale. He has an unusual gift: He leads you through amazing amounts of detail without burying you in by: 3.

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The Malbone Street Wreck book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. On November 1,as the Great War in Europe was entering its /5.

Now, Fordham University Press is proud to present Brian J. Cudahy's long-awaited account of the Malbone Street Wreck, a book that recounts the events leading up to the disaster, describes the faithful trip from its beginning to end, and reviews efforts conducted after the tragedy to Price: $ Now, Fordham University Press is proud to present Brian J.

Cudahy's long-awaited account of the Malbone Street Wreck, a book that recounts the events leading up to the disaster, describes the faithful trip from its beginning to end, and reviews efforts conducted after the tragedy to 5/5(1).

Now, Fordham University Press is proud to present Brian J. Cudahy's long-awaited account of the The Malbone Street Wreck book Street Wreck, a book that recounts the events leading up to the disaster, /5(7). Now, Fordham University Press is proud to present Brian J. Cudahy's long-awaited account of the Malbone Street Wreck, a book that recounts the events leading up to the disaster, describes the faithful trip from its beginning to end, and reviews efforts conducted after the The Malbone Street Wreck book to.

Although it took place inThe Malbone Street Wreck stands as the worst mass transit disaster in US history. And Brian Cudahy is the person to tell the tale.

He has an unusual gift: He leads you through amazing amounts of detail without burying you in minutia/5(7). The ensuing disaster, known ever since as the Malbone Street Wreck, took the lives of almost a hundred people and stands as the worst mass-transit accident in U.S. History.

Unlike the Titanic disaster, however, the Malbone Street Wreck has received scant. In his review of the book, The Malbone Street Wreck, onPaul Matus explains the image: The Malbone Street train sits in the BRT's 36th St.

Yard after salvage. The relatively minor damage to [the first car in the photo] shows why most in the first car escaped serious injury.

The wreck occurred at the overpass of what was then Malbone Street.

Description The Malbone Street Wreck PDF

Today, it is Empire Blvd, renamed because of the accident. (There is still a Malbone Street, but it is a nearby dead-end street.) The train rode under the street, then met today's Q line at the Prospect Park Station in Brooklyn, she says.

A mong the stories recently published in the dailies about past transit strikes, I saw none about the brief strike by motor-men employed by the privately owned Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT) in November It led directly to the Malbone Street wreck, in which a strikebreaker lost control of a Brighton Beach train during the evening rush on the grade down Crown Heights between Park.

Walter H. Simonson, a civil engineer and President of the American Lead Burning Company at 30 Church Street, who was a passenger in the third car of the train, said the wreck was caused in his opinion by the speed maintained by the motorman on the curved tracks leading into the subway beneath Malbone Street, at the approach to the new station at Prospect Park.

The Malbone Street Wreck and Other Disasters --App. The Fatal Trip of November 1, A Reconstructed Schedule --App. Fatally Injured Passengers in the Malbone Street Wreck --App.

Civil Settlements. Responsibility: Brian J. Cudahy. More information: Contributor biographical information; Publisher description. On Friday evening, November 1,a Brooklyn Rapid Transit subway train left the Park Row station in Manhattan, ran east across the East River, then south through Brooklyn.

At p.m., it crashed near the intersection of Malbone Street, Flatbush and Ocean Avenues; 93 people died and hundreds were injured. A photo of the Malbone Street Wreck on Nov.

1, Courtesy of the New York Transit Museum It was a tragedy so horrific that the name of the street was changed so New Yorkers would not be Author: Hannah Frishberg.

The Malbone Street Wreck, also known as the Brighton Beach Line Accident of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company (BRT), was a rapid transit railroad accident that occurred November 1,beneath the intersection of Flatbush Avenue, Ocean Avenue, and Malbone Street, in the community of Flatbush, least 93 individuals perished, making it one of the most deadly train crashes in United.

Fordham University Press is proud to present Brian Cudahy's long-awaited account of the Malbone Street Wreck, a book that recounts the events leading up to the disaster, describes the fateful train trip from its beginning to its terrible end, and reviews efforts conducted after the tragedy to fix blame and establish liability.

Malbone Street Wreck. November 1, marks the st Anniversary of the Malbone Street Wreck, the worst subway accident in the history of New York City. As we remember the tragic events of that day, we honor those who lost their lives and the families who were affected.

Product Information. This is an account of the Malbone Street Wreck, recounting the events leading up to the disaster, describing the fateful train trip from its beginning to its terrible end, and reviewing the efforts conducted after the tragedy to fix blame and establish liability.

"The Malbone Street Wreck" atwhich transcribes the New York Times article that appeared Novemeber 2,the morning after the wreck. Note especially that important details of the wreck are in error in the newspaper account, especially that the first car (which emerged light damaged—see picture above) bore the brunt of the damage and fatalities.

In the case of The Malbone Street Wreck, Alan D. Glick has identified some errors which, while not impacting either the thread of the story or the author's conclusions, nevertheless are of interest to the rail historian and deserving of a hearing.

Views expressed in signed reviews and commentary reflect the opinions of the author. Well, Ray has his occult book store on St. Mark’s Place, still a place of vibrant counter-culture in  Perhaps this a nod to New York’s most famous occult book store owned by Samuel Weisner which originally opened on ‘Book Row’ at 4th Avenue.

(By the time of the film, it had moved to East 24th Street. It’s been. “On the basis of faulty assumptions and a perfectly understandable desire to keep the trains rolling,” Brian Cudahy wrote in “The Malbone Street Wreck” (), “the B.R.T. awkwardly.

And, indeed, a quick survey of commuters at the Prospect Park subway station, including the booth agent and a train conductor, finds that none of them had heard of the Malbone Street wreck. Genre/Form: History Electronic books: Additional Physical Format: Print version: Cudahy, Brian J.

Malbone Street Wreck. New York: Fordham University Press, DENY ANIMOSITY TO B.R.T. OFFICIALS; Malbone Street Wreck Victims' Association Repudiates Vengeful Cries at Recent RESOLUTION TO LEWISDistrict Attorney Devotes Day toAffidavits with.

Eliza McGraw is the author of Here Comes Exterminator. which is about the Kentucky Derby winner. Books Design Food Music & Film The Malbone Street Wreck of American South.

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As is well-known, most of Malbone Street was renamed Empire Boulevard in the aftermath of a disastrous train crash on November 1, that happened under a Malbone Street overpass. What is less-well known is this surviving portion of Malbone Street. A look at the atlas above confirms that Malbone Street then made a jog to the southeast.

Malbone Street Wreck → Malbone Street wreck – Undiscussed move based on claim of proper name; sources mostly lowercase. Dicklyon15 January (UTC) This is a contested technical request. Anthony Appleyard15 January (UTC).

At least 93 straphangers — accounts vary — died Nov. 1, when a speeding subway train derailed on the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company’s Brighton Line, which now serves B and Q : Clayton Guse. The Malbone Street Wreck was a horrific tragedy that claimed over 90 lives and spurred important labor and safety reforms.

It was a pleasure to work with Majority Leader Cumbo and the MTA to unveil a new plaque commemorating this piece of history, and co-name a portion of Empire Blvd as Malbone. First responders faced difficult challenges when they arrived at Malbone Street. The wreck was partially in an open-cut trench about than feet below the surface and partially in the tunnel.

Ladders had to be procured. A block and tackle system had to be rigged to remove the seriously injured victims needing stretchers. The Malbone Street Wreck’s th anniversary will be marked this year across the city, including at the New York Transit Museum, but it is also the focus of .